Editorial: On Tuesday, Get Out and Vote

This is a call to exercise civic responsibility, to stop being shoddy critics, to suspend our cynicism regarding political participation.
Editorial: On Tuesday, Get Out and Vote
Foto: Aurelia Ventura / Impremedia/La Opinion

This Tuesday, California’s nearly 18 million registered voters will have the chance to influence the reality of our state and our nation.

This time around, the voices of Californians will have nationwide impact, particularly in choosing between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders to be the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee.

The ballots will also determine who will be the two final candidates to run for the U.S. Senate. Democrats Kamala Harris and Loretta Sánchez are the front-runners among a group of 34 contenders.

The voters who exercise their right on Tuesday will be able to decide the list of politicians who will occupy the 53 seats representing California in Congress. In November, those candidates will submit to the People’s mandate.

Two of the 5 seats in the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors – one of the most important positions in our area – will become vacant upon the retirement of veterans Michael Antonovich, serving since 1980, and Don Knabe, who occupied the post in 1996. The composition of the new board will make history.

Voters will also select the names on the final list of civil servants who will run for the State Assembly and Senate, choose among dozens of potential judges, and decide the fate of a proposed referendum to make the suspension of legislators possible.

In sum, voters will be extremely influential in this occasion.

That can only happen, however, if you, the Reader, who are a citizen and are registered to vote, cast your ballot on Tuesday.

This is a call to exercise civic responsibility, to stop being shoddy critics, to suspend our cynicism regarding political participation.

This is a call to change our complaints for ballots.

This is an invitation to people who have never – or seldom – voted to do so this time.

It is a reminder to our youth that we can only have our hopes set on them if they get involved and decide their future and their point of view by casting their ballots.

Voting is a moral obligation and a chance to start making the changes our society needs. This time, voting is also a chance to prevent it from falling into a void of violence and hostility.
This is your moment. This is your chance. Don’t let it pass.

On Tuesday, get out and vote.